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Difference between the Stored Procedures and Trigger

Posted by Senthilkumar Blogs | .NET Assemblies Dec 24, 2011
The stored procedures and triggers are very important objects in the databases. This blog helps to understand the key difference between these.
  • The stored procedures used for performing task

    The stored procedures normally used to performing user specified tasks. It can have the parameters. It can return multiple results set.
     
  • The Triggers for auditing work

    The triggers normally used for auditing work. It can be used to trace the activities of the table events.
     
  • The stored procedures can have the parameters

    The procedures can have the input and output parameters with all the data types available in the sql server as well as user defined data types.
     
  • The Triggers cannot have any parameters

    The triggers cannot have any parameters.
     
  • The stored procedure can be run independently

    The stored procedures can be run independently .It stores as a database object. It can be called from the application.
     
  • The triggers executes based on table events

    The DML triggers are get executed based on the table events defined on the particular table. There are different types of triggers like DML triggers, DDL triggers (from 2005 onwards) and logon triggers (from 2008 onwards).

    The DDL triggers can control the stored procedures creation, drop, ect.,
     
  • The stored procedure cannot call triggers

    The stored procedures cannot call the triggers directly. But when we do the DML operations on the table, if the corresponding table has the trigger then that time it will get trigger.
     
  • The triggers can call stored procedures

    The triggers can call the stored procedures.
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