Oracle Assimilates DTrace To Catch Up Red Hat Linux 6.5

Red Hat Enterprise Linux released RHEL 6.5 in late November to its Linux platform. It new features includes the support for Docker application containers, improved virtualization support, expanded storage capabilities, and support for the Precision Time Protocol (PTP).

Now Oracle has following the RHEL as it taken source code from Red Hat and rolled it into its own distribution, Oracle Linux 6.5. The only change to it is Oracle enhances some of the features of its own in the process.

The main difference between the two is that Oracle Linux ships with a different kernel by default whereas the every release in the RHEL 6 line has shipped with a kernel based on version 2.6.32. The latest version of Oracle is based on Linux kernel version 3.8.13. Even the two differs in major version numbers but there’s not a big difference between both as both are constant to apply patches and bug fixes to their respective products.

In this release Oracle combined its DTrace debugging technology into the Unbreakable Linux Kernel by default so that Oracle Linux can provide extreme support for DTrace. DTrace was initially designed for the proprietary Solaris OS.

Oracle Linux 6.5 includes ability to run Oracle Linux as a Hyper-V guest on Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 and also includes support for Linux Containers, improvements to InfiniBand support, along with other updates. Full list of changes in the latest kernel can be found here.

"There are many fundamental changes in this release, compared with the past CentOS-6 releases," the CentOS team wrote in its launch announcement, "and we highly recommend everyone study the Release Notes as well as the upstream Technical Notes about the changes and how they might impact your installation."

Most of the changes are associated with the new features and fixtures introduced in RHEL 6.5, some modifications are made by CentOS in its own packages as well as in RHEL packages. Installation images for CentOS 6.5 are available now from the website for x86 and x64.