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About Eclipse

This article is about astronomical eclipses. For other uses, see Eclipse (disambiguation).
"Total eclipse" redirects here. For other uses, see Total Eclipse (disambiguation).
Totality during the 1999 solar eclipse. Solar prominences can be seen along the limb (in red) as well as extensive coronal filaments.

An eclipse is an astronomical event that occurs when an astronomical object is temporarily obscured, either by passing into the shadow of another body or by having another body pass between it and the viewer. An eclipse is a type of syzygy.

The term eclipse is most often used to describe either a solar eclipse, when the Moon's shadow crosses the Earth's surface, or a lunar eclipse, when the Moon moves into the Earth's shadow. However, it can also refer to such events beyond the Earth–Moon system: for example, a planet moving into the shadow cast by one of its moons, a moon passing into the shadow cast by its host planet, or a moon passing into the shadow of another moon. A binary star system can also produce eclipses if the plane of the orbit of its constituent stars intersects the observer's position.

  1. ^ Staff (March 31, 1981). "Science Watch: A Really Big Syzygy" (Press release). The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-02-29. 

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