C# Corner

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  • WP7 - License to Print Money (Creating an App for the Windows Phone Marketplace)Feb 07, 2011. Windows 7 Phone has hit the marketplace with a splash and with it applications emerging every day. As a Silverlight developer myself, I have gone through the process of submitting a dice game to the Zune Marketplace. This article shares my experience and advice on creating and submitting your first Windows Phone app.
  • Think in LINQ: Yahtzee Score Calculator Using LINQ TechnologyJul 23, 2007. This article revisits the yahtzee program I wrote in 2002 and reimplements scoring using LINQ technology. It compares the old way of scoring with LINQ and shows you the advantages of using LINQ.
  • Yahtzee Program Using C#: Part IIJan 31, 2002. This is an update of the Yahtzee program for VS 2005. Included in this version is a Game Reset and a High Score Tracker. The Top Ten High Scores are tracked using an Array with sortable components. In this article we will talk about the IComparable interface used to make an object stored in an array sortable.
  • Yahtzee Program using C#Jan 24, 2000. The Visual C# environment has given the programmer the ability to create applications in RAD mode without the steep learning curve for the C++ programmer. (I do miss templates though!). The above application, yahtzee, is based on a popular poker-like dice game.

About yahtzee

This article is about the game. For the game developer and journalist, see Ben "Yahtzee" Croshaw.
Yahtzee
Yahtzee logo.svg
Present Yahtzee logo
Players 1 and up
Age range 8+
Playing time 30 minutes
Random chance High
Skill(s) required Luck, probability, strategy

Yahtzee is a dice game made by Milton Bradley (now owned by Hasbro), which was first marketed as "Yatzie" by National Association Service of Toledo, Ohio, in the early 1940s. Yatzie was included in a game set called "LUCK - 15 Grand Dice Games". It was marketed under the name of Yahtzee by game entrepreneur Edwin S. Lowe in 1956. The game is a development of earlier dice games such as Yacht, Generala, and Yogi. A public domain version of Yahtzee, which is popular especially in Scandinavia, is Yatzy. Yahtzee is also similar to the English game of Poker Dice and the Cheerio dice game.

The object of the game is to score the most points by rolling five dice to make certain combinations. The dice can be rolled up to three times in a turn to try to make one of the thirteen possible scoring combinations. A game consists of thirteen rounds during which the player chooses which scoring combination is to be used in that round. Once a combination has been used in the game, it cannot be used again.

The scoring combinations have varying point values, some of which are fixed values and others of which have the cumulative value of the dice. A Yahtzee is five-of-a-kind and holds the game's highest point value of 50 (not counting multiple "Yahtzees" in the same game).

Yahtzee was marketed by the E.S. Lowe company from 1956 till 1973. In 1973, the Milton Bradley Company purchased the E.S. Lowe Company and assumed the rights to produce and sell Yahtzee. During Lowe's ownership over 40 million Yahtzee games were sold in America and around the globe. The game has maintained its popularity. According to current owner Hasbro, 50 million Yahtzee games are sold each year.

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